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Terra Relicta Top 20 Of 2018



01. Dimmu Borgir -
Eonian
02. Amorphis -
Queen Of Time
03. Summoning -
With Doom We Come
04. MGT -
Gemini Nyte
05. Soul Dissolution -
Stardust
06. Crone -
Godspeed
07. Midas Fall -
Evaporate
08. Collapse Of Light -
Each Failing Step
09. Mournful Congregation -
The Incubus Of Karma
10. Auri -
Auri

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Random album

Ferndal - Ferndal (2017) - Review

Band: Ferndal
Album title: Ferndal
Release date: 21 April 2017
Label: Einheit Produktionen

Tracklist:
01. Ouverture Op. 1.1
02. Ferndal Op. 1.2
03. Ungelebtes Leben Op. 1.3
04. Klavierquintett in g-moll “Arntor, ein Krieger” Op. 1.4
05. In die Freiheit Op. 1.5
06. Ein später Gast Op. 1.6
07. Coda Op. 1.7

German melancholic/folk/classical/black metallers Ferndal started out in mid 2016 and now released their self-titled debut album. Ferndal's line-up consists of five talented musicians, being the main composers/lyricists Sorathiel (bass and vocals) and Lestaya (violoncello), plus Alboîn (drums), Abarus (guitars) and Sethras (guitars). This full-lenght debut of theirs features seven tracks, among them four long tracks and a classically orchestrated version of Windir’s, "Arntor". The cover artwork was created by the Spanish artist Norax, also known from the black metal band Lux Divina. The artwork of this release is pretty important as it shows the impressive painting of a desolated landscape, in which a single human, apparent as a shadow, stands before the sun in the shape of an eye. The motive reflects issues of the lyrics allegorizing the conception of the album. The lyrics address existentialist issues, self-reflection on life and death, self-knowledge that leads to freedom and growth of the individual.

Assuming the lyrics, Ferndal decided to explore different forms of expression in relation to the style of black metal. Instead of anger and hate, you will realize how melancholic and sad this album is. Ferndal is an ode to the melancholy of despair. The band basically manipulates two different musical atmospheres, but not unknown to each other. In this album we have the junction of classical music, represented mainly by the spectacular Lestaya cello and in the other hand the traditional rough black metal guitar riffs with some groaning vocals, yet clean as the guitars and drums.
 
The sound is a very melancholic, a bit folky, it's somehow clean and progressive style of black metal. In the tracks as "Coda", "Ouverture" and "Klavierquintett in g-moll, Arntor, ein Krieger", I felt myself surrounded by a fluid sensation between peace and despair. What impressed me most about this album was the classical music and guitars in kind of pain, very beautiful. Undoubtedly the classical part, the choirs and the vocals and the other instruments are in perfect harmony in certain sense. The melancholic tone, the epic and sweet atmosphere and all the elements added are impressive. As a lover of classical music, I would say that everything from this point of view is excellent.
 
But my problem lies in the fact that in the raw part, even if tackled in a more progressive way, the black metal elements had not convinced me. All the magnificence of the guitars that play along with the cello in many tracks are in a way lost when the band is introducing the heavy part. A greater engagement between the two styles is necessary to not obscure the whole thing. What I want to say is that an album like this that features a perfect, super emotional and epic piece of classical music deserves more fascinating, strong and an epic black metal approach as well. But afterall this is the first album of the band and the differentiated and artistic proposal presented in here lead me to believe that the next album will be just excellent.

Review written by: Felin Frost
Rating: 7,5/10

Recommended by Terra Relicta

Band: The Hills Mover
Album: Dead Notes [EP]
Release date: 11 May 2015
Label: Self-released

Dead Notes delivers an emotional journey through six songs, relying on a very minimalistic song structure, shifting from aerial tranquillity to poetic obscurity. The beauty of it lies in a passionate portrayal of a kaleidoscope of feelings, which emit sentimental romanticism, distortion of mind and the dense darkness in a very personal and narrative way. Building on simplistic acoustic guitar arrangements and playing with his vocal chords, Grégoire Fray eloquently poured his personal prints and impressions through his alter-ago, The Hills Mover, in beauteous soundscapes, which deliver a pastiche of colours and shades, from bright and colourful to stygian and murky. An astounding, dynamic flow of ambiances, which - in their simplicity of sound - hide incredibly strong and profound personal stories.

Read a full review HERE