This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

Please consider supporting this website by disabling your ad-blocker. This website does not use audio ads, pop-ups, or other annoyances. And please support Terra Relicta by giving a little donation if you can! Thank you!!!



Terra Relicta Top 20 Of 2018



01. Amorphis -
Queen Of Time
02. Dimmu Borgir -
Eonian
03. Khôrada - Salt
04. Immortal -
Northern Chaos Gods
05. MGT -
Gemini Nyte
06. Summoning -
With Doom We Come
07. Crone -
Godspeed
08. Primordial -
Exile Amongst The Ruins
09. Atrium Carceri & Herbst9 -
Ur Djupan Dal
10. Mournful Congregation -
The Incubus Of Karma

More HERE

Random album

Strap On Halo - Prayers For The Living (2016) - Review

Band: Strap On Halo
Album title: Prayers For The Living
Release date: 19 January 2016
Label: Self-Released

Tracklist:
01. Call For The Rain
02. Chameleon
03. Until The Break
04. Monsters
05. Devils Dance
06. Hunger
07. Desert Frost
08. Lenore
09. Little White Lies
10. Prayers For The Living
11. When They Come For You

From Midwestern United States on the Missouri River comes the female fronted trio named Strap On Halo. Even though the first foundations of the band were set back in 1994, the first release, an EP titled Cherry Flavored Quick Fix, saw the light of the day only in 2009 and called some attention to the band in American goth underground with their 80s inspired style. In the beginning of this year the band came out with their sophomore full-lenght named Prayers For The Living, a follow up to 2011's The Dead Don't Lie. Strap On Halo who in their line-up consist of vocalist, the goth lady Layla Reyna, guitarist Seán Rial and bassist Marc Rhön, are a band who will appeal only, and I mean it, only to those unpretentious gothsters who like their goth in its most purest peeled out form, without any kitsch, but also without beauty.

Prayers For The Living features eleven tracks, all of them very similar between each other, everything is pretty much minimalistic, in a way tribalistic, yet hypnotic. With quite captivating, but too much mellow voice Layla leads the listener through those vintage fueled sonorities. Typical, unpretentious howling traditional guitar lines, reminiscent to some early cold wave bands, then simplistic drum beats and linear reverberate bass lines which are just following the main rhythm, are nothing you haven't heard before. So, to make a notion with the likes as are The Spiritual Bat, Asylum Party, Faith And The Muse, Two Witches, Siouxsie And The Banshees or even Lydia Lunch, I think that you must have a picture in your mind about what kind of music I'm talking about. Strap On Halo don't try for a second to make something spectacular, they rather stick to the legacy of early incarnations of the genre. There's kind of that unmistakable American sound inherited in their music, so I believe that even those of you who like Christian Death, Kommunity FK or Nox Arcana can try this out.

The music on Prayers For The Living lacks in dynamics and density, that's for sure, but some nice rather groovy post-punkish upbeat elements and gloomy dark wave tinged synths here and there, for example in my favorite track "Hunger", do serve its purpose to create kind of a scarry captivating atmosphere. As well the depressive and melancholic "Lenore", then the rather folkish ritualistic "Desert Frost" and with catchy guitar lead spiced up "Little White Lies" are the tracks in which handful of gothsters could find some amusement. Prayers For The Living is after all an album that needs some attention, it's quite hard to get it in one piece, but it might became addictive in a strange way after some listens if the mood is right. The production is good, also the cover artwork works out, but to be honest I think that Strap On Halo forgot in which year are we now. Gothic rock, cold wave, dark wave, post-punk and other close genres evolved so much that I'm afraid if an album like this could get some exposure. It might have a title Prayers For The Living, but I think it's more like a lullaby for the dead.

Review written by: T.V.
Rating: 5,5/10

Recommended by Terra Relicta

Band: Ugasanie
Album title: The Dark Side
Release date: 19 September 2015
Label: Black Mara Records

Ugasanie takes a vacation from his often polar dark ambient style, to give us a truly eerie album! White Silence's “To The Lord Of The Polar Desert With Seven Faces” and “Arctic Hysteria” on Call Of The North gave us a hint of some of the creepier territory that Ugasanie was comfortable in. However these tracks were part of greater polar-themed albums. The Dark Side takes us to a whole new place with Ugasanie, down the deep dark corridors of the underworld itself. The Dark Side is an ode to death and eternity, where you will hear field recordings captured in places such as morgues and cemeteries. It is a prayer to Mara, the Slavic goddess associated with seasonal rites based on the idea of death and rebirth of nature. She is associated with death, winter, and nightmares. A very fitting patroness for Ugasanie and a fitting name for the fledgling label Black Mara, which specializes in dark ambient. The darkness Ugasanie portrays here is as cinematic as it is unnerving, yet it is never too harsh or overwhelming for the listener. It holds us tightly in Mara’s embrace and keeps us there from beginning to end. Ugasanie has shown us the darkness of Mara, goddess of death, in a brilliant collection of tracks. This album is highly recommended for any fan of dark ambient with equal amounts of subtlety and aggression.

Read a full review HERE